Clockwise

Do you enjoy waiting? No? Well, neither does Phillip Han, one of the co-founders of Clockwise, a product that allows patients to get a more accurate estimation of wait-time, with sales to over 400 clinics already. “I’m the type of guy who hates waiting,” Han reveals. “If I don’t know how long I’ll have to wait, I become frustrated.”

From this dislike of waiting arose a product that helps mitigate wait-time in health clinics. When Han and Phong Si, college friends, met Michael Burke at a startup weekend event, and Burke pitched the idea of Clockwise to them. In 2012, Clockwise was born. Currently, Burke serves as the company’s CEO, Han as its Director of Product Management, and Si as its Director of Technology.

Clockwise has always been a “patient satisfaction tool,” insists Han. In a typical urgent care clinic, patients arrive and judge their wait-time depending on how many other patients they see waiting. Frequently, even employees at the front desk cannot give the patient an accurate wait-time estimation. This typical urgent care scenario frustrates patients because they do not know who or what they are waiting for, or how long they must wait.

This is where Clockwise comes in. Clinics subscribe to Clockwise on a monthly basis, and may cancel anytime they wish. With urgent care and emergency room clinics, patients are able to visit the clinic’s website and view the waiting time. They can even reserve a spot, similar to reserving a table in a restaurant. Patients are therefore guaranteed an appointment with the doctor. With primary and secondary care clinics, another feature of Clockwise is that it texts a patient if the clinic is running behind schedule. For example, if a clinic is running 30 minutes behind schedule, and a patient’s appointment is at 1 PM, Clockwise will text a patient telling him or her to arrive at 1:30 PM instead of 1 PM. This reduces patient frustration because patients are not spending unnecessary time waiting in the clinic.

Although Clockwise gets the occasional call from an international clinic, most of their business is still in the States. “Eventually we want to expand internationally,” Han explains, “but it will take some time because we have to really understand what their healthcare is like – it’s all very different.”